University of California 2010 Accountability Report

Indicator 72
Faculty Publications by Discipline, UC Campuses, 2008

Data visualization. please download the source data for accessible information. Data visualization. please download the source data for accessible information. Data visualization. please download the source data for accessible information. Data visualization. please download the source data for accessible information. Data visualization. please download the source data for accessible information. Data visualization. please download the source data for accessible information.

The number of faculty publications is a measure, albeit imperfect, of the quantity of faculty research. The metrics on the next two pages show faculty publications across three broad academic disciplines-health and life sciences, physical sciences and engineering, and social sciences and humanities.

  • The first chart in each set shows the total number of faculty publications by campus within each broad academic discipline; the second chart shows faculty publications by campus normalized by the number of Senate faculty within that discipline.
  • Within a given academic discipline, differences in faculty publications are due to a number of factors, among them the size of departments and the number of faculty at each campus working in a particular field. Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco, for example, all have large medical centers and associated faculty.
  • Published outputs cannot be used to compare faculty research productivity across disciplines. While all academic disciplines strive for excellence, different disciplines have different standards of merit and validation in terms of types, frequency and venues for the dissemination of research.
  • Some disciplines favor shorter, multi-authored publications while other disciplines favor longer, sole-authored publications. Co-authorship, for example, is more common in the life and physical sciences, where credit is shared with a team of researchers, than in the social sciences and humanities, where papers tend to be sole-authored. Thus, faculty in the life and physical sciences may have more publications credited to them than faculty in the social sciences and humanities, in part, because of different norms regarding publication.
  • Faculty in the social sciences and the humanities also publish books as well as scholarly articles; however, the SCOPUS database, from which the data for this indicator is drawn, does not contain books. Thus, it underestimates faculty research contributions in the social sciences and humanities.
  • Capturing the quality of faculty research, as determined by the significance and importance of new ideas generated, is challenging. Future accountability reports will attempt to capture the quality of faculty research, in part, through analysis of faculty citation indices. The Academic Senate also assesses academic quality as part of the merit review process for individual faculty.

Source: SCOPUS. Additional information can be found at: http://info.scopus.com/.

Data on faculty publications comes from SCOPUS, a database of abstracts and citations for scholarly journal articles. SCOPUS covers nearly 18,000 titles from more than 5,000 international publishers; it includes 16,500 peer-reviewed journals in the scientific, technical, medical and social science (including arts and humanities) fields. SCOPUS assigns each scholarly journal in its database to a particular academic discipline; articles appearing in a specific journal are considered to have been published in the academic discipline assigned to that journal.

The number of faculty used in the "per faculty" calculation are headcount of Senate faculty who are primarily those in the Professorial series, Professors in Residence series and the Professor of Clinical ___ series as well as a handful of other faculty members. Some non-Senate faculty members and some other academic employees conduct significant research and publish the results of their research. Some of these researchers may hold a joint Senate faculty title; if so, they are included in the Senate faculty headcount figures used here. Future versions of the Accountability Report will attempt to refine the number of faculty included in the "per faculty" calculations.

You may view or download a table of the raw data used to generate these charts in CSV files, which can be opened in spreadsheet programs such as Microsoft Excel or OpenOffice.