Accountability Report 2022

Chapter 7:
chapter 7: diversity

UC Irvine is one of five UC campuses federally-designated as a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), meaning that Hispanic/Latinx students make up more than a quarter of the student body.

The University of California was honored with a 2021 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. UC won the award based on its strong commitment to diversity and inclusion, particularly its focus on recruiting and retaining diverse students and staff, Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, said in a press release. The other factor was the high level of support by UC leaders for UC’s diversity and inclusion efforts.

“We strive to reflect California’s full diversity across our campuses every day. Respecting and celebrating diverse views, life experiences and backgrounds is essential to UC’s standing as a world-class institution,” said Yvette Gullatt, vice president for Graduate and Undergraduate Affairs, vice provost for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and chief diversity officer for the University of California. “We’re pleased and proud to see that commitment recognized today.”

A few highlights of UC’s commitment to serving all Californians:
• UC admitted its most diverse class of California freshmen in history this year, with 43 percent of students coming from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups;
• Five of UC’s nine undergraduate campuses are federally designated Hispanic-Serving Institutions and the remaining campuses are expected to follow suit soon;
• UC has a strong partnership with the nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which is helping it diversify its ranks of graduate students;
• 40 percent of UC undergraduates are among the first in their families to attend college;
• Nearly 1 in 3 UC undergraduates has transferred from a community college;
• A presidential policy, adopted this year, ensures that all individuals are identified by their accurate gender identity and
lived or preferred name on University-issued documents and in UC’s information systems.


Goals

The University of California strives to create diverse, equitable, and inclusive communities for students, faculty, and staff. The University supports initiatives that increase the representation of historically underrepresented populations and foster inclusive living, learning, and working environments. 

The University’s diversity goals are established in Regents Policy 4440: University of California Diversity Statement, which states, in part: 

  • Because the core mission of the University of California is to serve the interests of the State of California, it must seek to achieve diversity among its student bodies and among its employees.
  • The State of California has a compelling interest in making sure that people from all backgrounds perceive that access to the University is possible for talented students, staff, and faculty from all groups.
  • Therefore, the University of California renews its commitment to the full realization of its historic promise to recognize and nurture merit, talent, and achievement by supporting diversity and equal opportunity in its education, services, and administration, as well as research and creative activity.

The public health, economic, and social crises of COVID-19 have tested the University’s ability to meet these goals. In addition to reviewing diversity and equity gains and gaps, this introduction includes student survey information about how the COVID-19 pandemic and the shift to remote learning impacted diverse university populations.

Findings

UC is making progress in several key areas related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. These include:

  • Increases in the percentage of first-generation undergraduate enrollment and persistence.
  • Increases in the percentage of underrepresented groups (URG)[1] graduate students for enrollment and persistence.
  • Increases in the percentage of URG faculty.
  • Increase in the percentage of URG staff at campuses/locations and University of California Health.

At the same time, there are challenges and areas in which progress needs to be made. These include:

  • Enrollment rates are low for Hispanic/Latino(a) undergraduates compared to their admission rate.
  • Undergraduate African American students are less likely than other ethnic groups to agree that they are respected on campus.
  • African American and American Indian graduate and professional students are less likely than other students to feel that their culture is respected on campus.
  • A graduation gap persists between URG undergraduates and White and Asian American undergraduates (presented in Chapter 3 of this report).
  • The proportion of women and URG faculty is low, compared to availability pools in most disciplines (presented in Chapter 5).
  • The proportion of URG faculty separations is greater than URG faculty hires (presented in Executive Summary).
  • Senior Management (SMG) ranks are lacking in racial/ethnic diversity, compared to entry-level and professional staff ranks at UC.

[1] URG students include African American, American Indian, and Hispanic/Latino(a)

Evaluating Diversity

UC evaluates its diversity outcomes in a variety of ways: current demographic characteristics and trends of its students, faculty, and staff; analysis of the academic pipeline from entry to exit; and survey data that reveal perceptions of campus climate, experiences of campus life, and remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Chapters 1 through 6 present an overview of trends for undergraduate, graduate academic and graduate professional students, faculty, and staff. This feeds into a holistic analysis of University diversity, equity, and inclusion outcomes using the demographic characteristics of race/ethnicity, gender, first-generation college-going status, and international student status. 

Pipeline

UC diversity outcomes are also assessed by examining the various steps along the academic pipeline. In the undergraduate pipeline from high school graduation to the end of the first year at UC, about six in ten California public high school twelfth-graders come from historically underrepresented groups. However, only less than four in ten of these twelfth-graders who enrolled in UC and persisted past their first year came from underrepresented ethnic groups. This is a strong indication that UC is not retaining the diversity of its students enrolled from California public high schools equitably after the first-year college experience.

The University of California’s multi-year framework — UC 2030 — focuses on expanding the pipeline to and within the University. For example, one part of eliminating timely graduation gaps for underrepresented groups is that a greater proportion will go on to graduate school, and one of the goals of growing graduate enrollment is to increase spaces for these students. UC’s increasing diversity of doctoral students will expand the availability pool of potential faculty hires, supporting efforts to diversify the professoriate.

Surveying Students about Diversity on Campus

This chapter presents responses to the UC Undergraduate Experience Survey (UCUES), administered every two years to all undergraduates. The University’s goal is to have all its students feel respected on campus, regardless of race/ethnicity, nationality, religious affiliation, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, or political beliefs.

UCUES data show most undergraduates feel students of their race/ethnicity are respected on campus, but the proportion of African American respondents sharing this perspective is lower than other groups. Among religious identifications, Muslim and Jewish students are less likely to feel respected. LGBTQ+ students are also less likely to feel respected, as are students identifying as politically conservative.

Impact of COVID-19 on diverse student population

Spring 2020 UCUES results showed 64 percent of undergraduates responding had high confidence (somewhat to very high) about using tools for remote learning, with slightly less confidence for first-generation, African American, and Hispanic/Latino(a) students. First-generation students from underrepresented populations were more likely to lack appropriate equipment and study spaces and to have greater family responsibilities due to COVID-19. With the COVID-19 pandemic, many students returned home. First-generation, Pell Grant recipients, and underrepresented students were less likely to have both adequate access to the internet and appropriate study space, making remote instruction a greater challenge when compared to peers. Thirty-five percent of all undergraduates were very concerned about having access to an appropriate study space, but it was at least ten points higher for first-generation, Pell Grant recipients, and underrepresented students.

UC campuses attempted to assess and meet the technology needs of students by providing laptops and internet hotspots. For example, UC Berkeley conducted a student technology survey to estimate the funds needed to purchase laptops in its Student Technology Equity Program (STEP). Other UC campuses used a range of outreach efforts — communications with deans and department chairs, student service and advising units, and prompts on campus learning management systems — to identify students who needed technology support.

Looking Forward — Diversity Initiatives

UC has made considerable investments in 2020 and 2021 to diversify the faculty, staff, and student body. It has sustained support for programs that promote the recruitment and retention of underrepresented faculty populations; expanded implicit bias training opportunities for student leaders, faculty, staff, and senior administrators; enhanced university information systems and operational processes to more fully recognize historically underserved populations; and rolled out initiatives designed to transform specific campuses and locations to be anti-racist and Black-thriving places to work and learn.

Implicit bias trainings — The 2018 California Budget Act included a one-time appropriation of $1.2 million to contract out and implement an anti-bias training pilot program for administrators, faculty, staff, and student leaders at the campuses of the University of California and the California State University. The pilot program was branded Moving Beyond Bias, and it includes content on racial, gender, and religious bias. Regional trainings took place in Oakland, Sacramento, and Northridge. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, further trainings and sessions were conducted virtually. The training module was customized and delivered to UC admissions officers and readers, the CSU Chancellor’s Office, and the CSU Academic Senate. Two Moving Beyond Bias ecourses are currently under production, one version for a general staff audience and a second version for UC admissions officers and readers.

(new) Anti-discrimination policy working group – A systemwide workgroup consisting of policy subject matter experts and diversity, equity, and inclusion leaders was convened to advise on critical policy issues to support the development of a Presidential policy on discrimination and harassment that applies to all employees and students. The policy will address education and training, employment practices in hiring and retention, and prevention. The workgroup will develop procedures for implementation of policy at all UC locations to unify responses and ensure appropriate actions, in response to allegations of discrimination and harassment. The policy will undergo systemwide comment and review in fall 2022 with the intention of issuing the policy in summer 2023.

Anti-racism initiatives and resources — In the wake of the George Floyd murder, demand for anti-racism trainings, listening sessions, educational opportunities, resources, and commitments to institutional change increased dramatically across the UC system. Chief diversity officers and other diversity, equity, and inclusion professionals continue to be frontline responders, innovators, and leaders in this climate. A systemwide landing page of anti-racism trainings, webinars, healing sessions, and resources has been created (diversity.universityofcalifornia.edu), and continues to be refreshed and curated. The site also includes resources on anti-Asian racism and highlights long-term initiatives to address gaps in African American representation, outcomes and feelings of belonging and respect, such as UC Irvine’s Black Thriving Initiative, UC Merced’s Valuing Black Lives Initiative, and UC San Diego’s Black Academic Excellence Initiative.

(new) Minority serving institution — The University is poised to be the leading exemplar of a research-intensive public university system that is also home to minority-serving institutions (MSI). With five undergraduate campuses already designated by the US Department of Education as Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI), four institutions recognized as Emerging HSIs, and two Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISI), the system is drawing upon its strengths in research, teaching, and service to propel the University forward as a minority-serving research institution. The successful model of the UC HispanicServing Institutions Initiative is being replicated to develop a similar initiative for AANAPISI status at more of the undergraduate campuses. The key for both of these initiatives is to move from enrolling to serving, which requires intentional and strategic planning to build a minority-thriving research university system that exceeds student outcomes for marginalized and underrepresented groups.

(new) Tribal citizenship and affiliation Enhancements have been made to the undergraduate application to improve recognition of the tribal citizenship, affiliation, and diversity of Native American and Alaska Native applicants. Starting with the 2022 undergraduate application cycle, questions about tribal citizenship will be added to the citizenship and residency section of Apply UC, and additional disaggregated tribal affiliation options will be added to the demographic racial and ethnic section for federal reporting. The new changes, reflecting guidance provided by the President’s Native American Advisory Council, enable the University to collect, report, and compare demographic data on Native American and Alaska Native populations within and across populations with greater nuance and attention to tribal affiliation and sovereignty.

(new) UC Native American opportunity plan – Staring with fall 2022, UC’s Native American Opportunity Plan ensures that in-state systemwide Tuition and Student Services Fees are fully covered for California students who are also enrolled in federally recognized Native American, American Indian, and Alaska Native tribes. The plan applies to new and continuing undergraduate, graduate, and professional school students in state-funded degree programs who don’t already qualify for financial aid that covers their tuition. The plan increases UC’s affordability, advances student diversity and inclusive excellence, and acknowledges historical wrongs endured by Native Americans. The plan is increasing interest in the University among Native American communities. California’s Native American tribes and other external organizations may provide scholarships to Native American students who are not members of a federally recognized tribe. 

UC gender recognition and lived name policy Following the 2019 passage of the Gender Recognition Act (California Senate Bill 179), the University drafted and passed the Gender Recognition and Lived Name Policy on November 17, 2020, which states that the University “must provide the minimum three equally recognized gender options on university-issued documents and IT Resource systems woman, man and nonbinary and an efficient process for current students and employees and UC alumni and affiliates to retroactively amend their gender designations and lived names on University-issued documents, including eligible academic documents, and in IT resource systems.” The new change enables the University to collect and report demographic data and visualizations that compare outcomes for individuals whose genders are woman, man, and nonbinary.

Systemwide advisory workgroup on students with disability — In order to achieve equitable experiences for all students at UC and to address the increasing population of students with disabilities at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional student levels, a systemwide advisory workgroup focused on UC students with disabilities was formed in fall 2021 and will convene through 2023. A workgroup of dedicated subject matter experts, faculty, and students are responsible for a close examination of the current student experience and will make recommendations for the future culture and practices of UC in support of students with disabilities. Approximately seven percent of UC students identify as disabled. According to 2020-21 data, the most frequent accommodation is psychological followed by learning disability.

UC community safety plan — After national unrest and movements for racial justice in 2020, UC convened a summit, inclusive of students, faculty, staff, and subject matter experts on UC’s current and future campus safety practices. From the summit emerged a plan released in 2021 that represents a transformational change for UC toward a more data-driven, service-oriented, community-centric approach to campus safety. Under this new model, a multidisciplinary team of mental health professionals, campus police, social service providers, police accountability boards, and other personnel will work together to prioritize the well-being of the entire UC community. This reimagined structure will ensure that the most appropriate responders are deployed to meet community-specific needs with tailored care, resources, and services. The plan also puts in place important new measures to ensure accountability and transparency in how UC approaches campus safety. New advisory bodies that reflect UC’s diverse campus communities will provide independent oversight. A centralized data dashboard will track the progress UC is making across the system, providing information needed to answer timely questions and continually improve. Real-time platforms will empower anyone to provide immediate feedback on interactions with campus safety staff.

President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program (PPFP) — Established in 1984, the program recruits top scholars who are committed to underserved and minority communities to pursue faculty careers at UC. Between 2017–18 and 2021–22, 124 fellows were hired as UC ladder-rank faculty at all ten UC campuses. In addition, 21 fellows have been successfully recruited for UC faculty positions that will begin in 2022–23, with 13 others still under consideration. Through Presidential support, UC has increased the number of incentives available to departments that hire fellows and has expanded eligibility for hiring incentives to include the health sciences and professional schools. The program is nationally recognized and leads a partnership of top universities that participate in recruiting top postdoc talent.

Advancing Faculty Diversity (AFD) — The State of California awarded UC a total of $11.5 million in one-time funds for five fiscal years, from 2016–17 to 2019–20, and in 2021–22, to develop an innovative and focused program to increase faculty diversity at UC. The Advancing Faculty Diversity (AFD) program awards these funds on a competitive basis to campus units implementing new measurable interventions in the faculty recruitment process. Some of the successful interventions that correlate with hiring diverse faculty include the use of contributions to diversity statements early in the evaluation process; targeting potential faculty earlier in their careers through support for postdoctoral work; outreach by faculty to actively recruit candidates; revised evaluation practices, including the use of rubrics to guide decision-making; strong leadership and sustained and strategic involvement from unit leaders; mentoring programs targeted to support new faculty hires; introducing new voices, including students, in the recruitment and evaluation process; building of new faculty, equity, and inclusion data dashboards; research on and support for pathways to faculty leadership positions; and examinations of whether service loads differ by gender or race/ethnicity. In 2018–19, UCOP committed additional funds ($500,000) to initiate awards in support of improved academic climate and retention in selected pilots, and made a commitment of $3 million per year in ongoing funds to support additional projects in faculty recruitment and in improved climate and retention projects to create academic climates to support UC’s diverse student body and meaningfully engage faculty throughout their UC careers. Since its inception, a total of fifty-five recruitment and improved climate and retention projects have been funded through the competitive AFD program, with all ten campuses receiving at least one award. A May 2022 Regents item, linked below, provides additional details and context.

For More Information

Undergraduate admissions (dashboard)

Graduate admissions (dashboard)

Fall enrollment at a glance (dashboard)

Degrees awarded (dashboard)

UCUES COVID-19 and remote learning (dashboard)

Moving Beyond Bias (website)

Gender Recognition and Lived Name Policy (website)

UC Anti-racism Resources (dashboard)

May 2022 Regents item on Advancing Faculty Diversity (pdf)




UC freshman enrollees do not reflect the diversity of California's high school graduates.

7.1.1 Racial/ethnic distribution of the UC undergraduate pipeline, Universitywide, Fall 2020 new freshman cohort from California public high schools

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Sources: California Department of Education; UC Data Warehouse

About six in ten California public high school 9th-graders are from historically underrepresented ethnic groups (American Indian, African American, Hispanic/Latino(a)). However, less than four in ten of these 12th-graders who enrolled in UC and persisted past their first year were from underrepresented ethnic groups. At almost every point of the eligibility and enrollment process, fewer students from underrepresented ethnic groups are included.






undergraduate pipeline

Gaps still exist between the share of high school graduates and the share of UC applicants, admits and new enrollees for African Americans and Hispanic/Latino(a).

7.1.2 Share of high school graduates, applicants, admits, and enrollees, Universitywide

7.1.2

Source: UC Information Center Data Warehouse, California Department of Finance, and California Department of Education.

Gaps that still exist between the share of high school graduates and the share of UC applicants, admits, and new enrollees for some racial/ethnic groups. Over time, changes in admissions policy have affected these trends, such as:

  • 1998 Proposition 209 prohibits use of race/ethnicity and gender;
  • 2001 Eligibility in the Local Context (ELC) program starts;
  • 2002 Regents policy on comprehensive review goes into effect;
  • 2012 Implementation of Entitled to Review (ETR) policy, elimination of SAT II requirement, and ELC expanded from top four percent to top nine percent.



Gaps still exist between the share of transfer-ready California community college students and the share of UC applicants, admits, and new enrollees for African Americans and Hispanic/Latino(a).

7.1.3 Share of transfer-ready students at California community college student applicants, admits, and enrollees, Universitywide

7.1.3Source: UC Information Center Data Warehouse and California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office

Gaps that still exist between the share of transfer- ready CA community college students and the share of UC transfer applicants, admits, and new enrollees for some racial/ethnic groups. Over time, changes in admissions policy have affected these trends, such as:

  • 1998 Proposition 209 prohibits use of race/ethnicity and gender;
  • 2002 Regents policy on comprehensive review goes into effect;

Transfer-ready students are those who have successfully completed a transferable English and a transferable math course and have earned 60+ transferable units with a 2.00+ GPA. These data reflect the number of students who reach this status each year.




UC academic doctoral programs are a strong draw for international students who did not earn their bachelor's degree in the United States.

7.2.1 Racial/ethnic distribution of U.S. BA/BS degree recipients from US and UC institutions compared to UC doctoral applicants, admits, and enrollees, Universitywide, 2019-20

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Sources: Integrated Postsecondary Educational Data System; UC Information Center Data Warehouse

UC’s graduate programs draw students from across the nation and around the world, including its own undergraduate students, who make up about one-tenth of UC’s graduate students. As a result, UC’s efforts to diversify its undergraduate students also help to diversify its graduate academic population.

Because recent Ph.D. recipients create the talent pool for new faculty, a critical means for increasing the diversity of the faculty is to increase the diversity of doctoral degree recipients.




In graduate academic doctoral programs, UC is approaching parity with the gender diversity of U.S. institutions, in most fields.

7.2.2 Gender distribution of US BA/BS degree recipients from US and UC institutions compared to UC doctoral applicants, admits, and enrollees, Universitywide, 2019-20

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Sources: Integrated Postsecondary Educational Data System; UC Information Center Data Warehouse

Female students make up less than half of U.S. Bachelor’s degree recipients and UC doctoral students in Physical Sciences and Engineering & Computer Science. At the graduate level, female representation among UC doctoral enrollees from U.S. colleges and universities is within five
percentage points of the female representation among all U.S. Bachelor’s degree recipients in all fields except Engineering & Computer Science, where the representation of women is actually higher than that of U.S. Bachelor degree recipients.




7.2 GRADUATE STUDENT PIPELINE

African American and American Indian graduate and professional students are less likely than other students to feel that their culture is respected on campus.

7.2.3 Response to “I feel included by my peers,” Universitywide and UC campuses, Spring 2021, Percent who agree or strongly agree

7.2.3

The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UC Graduate Student Experience Survey

7.2.4 Response to “IMy culture is respected by my peers,” Universitywide and UC campuses, Spring 2021, Percent who agree or strongly agree

7.2.4

The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UC Graduate Student Experience Survey

The University of California Graduate Student Experience Survey (UCGSES) is a systemwide survey that offers valuable insight about population-based experiences of respect and belonging. The survey was administered for the first time in Spring 2021.

The complete data tables for UCGSES are available at the UC Information Center: universityofcalifornia.edu/about-us/information-center/UCGSES-data-tables

American Indian, African American, and Hispanic/Latino(a) graduate and professional students report that members of their racial and ethnic group are less likely to feel included by their peers compared to other racial and ethnic groups. In addition, African American and American Indian graduate and professional students report that they are less likely to feel as if they are respected by their peers compared to other racial and ethnic groups at the University.




Undergraduates have the highest proportion of underrepresented students. Faculty are less diverse overall.

7.3.1 Racial/ethnic distribution of students and faculty, domestic populations only, Universitywide, Selected years, fall 2012 to 2021

7.3.1

Source: UC Information Center Data Warehouse. Undergraduates include approximately 300 postbaccalaureate teaching credential students.Only includes US citizens and permanent residents.

International students and faculty are excluded from the graph above for comparability purposes. The undergraduate population is the most likely to be Hispanic/Latinx. Its share of the population has risen for all groups. The African American share of the population has been flat for undergraduates, but has grown among graduate students and faculty. Graduate students, both academic and professional, are more likely to be White. This is also true for faculty.

Information on availabilities compared to hires by discipline group is presented in Chapter 5.




African American undergraduate students are less likely than other students to feel that students of their race/ethnicity are respected on their campus.

7.4.1 Response to “Students of my race/ethnicity are respected on this campus,” Universitywide and UC campuses, Spring 2020
Percent who agree or strongly agree

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The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UCUES. Caution should be exercised in interpretation of the Native American group due to small cell sizes. Pacific Islander will be separated from Asian in the next UCUES survey.

7.4.2 Response to “I feel I belong at this university,” Universitywide and UC campuses, Spring 2020
Percent who agree or strongly agree

7-4-2

The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UCUES. Caution should be exercised in interpretation of the Native American group due to small cell sizes. Pacific Islander will be separated from Asian in the next UCUES survey.

The University of California Undergraduate Experience Survey (UCUES) offers insight into population-based experiences of respect and belonging.

African American students report that members of their racial and ethnic group are less likely to be respected on campus compared to other racial and ethnic groups, and this outcome is consistent across all UC campuses. Overall, African American students report that they are less likely to feel as if they belong at the University.




7.4 UNDERGRADUATE CAMPUS CLIMATE

Students vary widely in whether they feel their religious beliefs are respected.

7.4.3 Response to “Students of my religion are respected on this campus,” Universitywide, Spring 2020
Percent who agree or strongly agree

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The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UCUES

UC undergraduate students represent a diverse range of religions, sects, and faith traditions, including atheism. However, less than 50 percent of students who self-identify with Muslim and Jewish traditions report that their religious beliefs are respected on campus. Less than 50 percent of Non-denominational Evangelical Christians and Mormons also reported their religious beliefs are respected on campus.




Undergraduates who identify as LGBQ are less likely to feel respected on campus than those who do not.

7.4.4 “Students of my sexual orientation are respected on this campus”, Universitywide, Spring 2020

7-4-4

Source: UCUES. Caution should be used in interpretation of Native American, queer, questioning and “other” groups due to small cell sizes. Gender identity by race/ethnicity is not shown due to small cell sizes and lack of response.

7.4.5 Response to “Students of my sexual orientation are respected on this campus,” by race/ethnicity
Students who agree or strongly agree, Universitywide, Spring 2020

7.4.5

The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UCUES. Caution should be used in interpretation of Native American, queer, questioning and “other” groups due to small cell sizes. Gender identity by race/ethnicity is not shown due to small cell sizes and lack of response.

7.4.6 Response to “I feel that I belong at this university,” by sexual orientation, percent who agree or strongly agree, Universitywide, Spring 2020

7-4-6

The other choices provided were “somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, disagree, and strongly disagree.”
Source: UCUES. Caution should be used in interpretation of Native American, queer, questioning and “other” groups due to small cell sizes. Gender identity by race/ethnicity is not shown due to small cell sizes and lack of response.

Undergraduate students questioning their sexual orientation and students who self-identify as bisexual, gay, lesbian, other, and queer are less likely to feel respected than their peers who self-identify as heterosexual and straight. When race and ethnicity are added, African American LGBQ students are less likely to feel respected.

Counts and shares by sexual orientation are available on the Campus Climate tab of universityofcalifornia.edu/infocenter/ucues-data-tables-2020




7.4 UNDERGRADUATE CAMPUS CLIMATE

Undergraduates who identify as other than male or female are less likely to feel respected on campus than those who do not.

7.4.7 Response to “Students of my gender are respected on this campus,” Spring 2020

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Source: UCUES

In terms of UC’s diverse gender communities, transwomen, transmen, gender queer, gender non-conforming and students that identify with another gender not listed are less likely to feel respected than their peers who are women and men. For this year’s report, the gender data cannot be further disaggregated by race and ethnicity due to the limited number of individuals across racial and ethnic groups indicating that they are transgender, gender queer, and gender non-conforming.

Counts and shares by gender are available on the Campus Climate tab of: universityofcalifornia.edu/infocenter/ucues-data-tables-2020




7.4 UNDERGRADUATE CAMPUS CLIMATE

Very conservative undergraduates are less likely to feel that students of their political views are respected on campus than those with liberal or moderate political opinions.

7.4.8 Response to “Students of my political beliefs are respected on this campus,” Universitywide, Spring 2020

7-4-8

Source: UCUES

Data of counts and shares by political orientation are available on the last tab of: universityofcalifornia.edu/infocenter/ucues-data-tables-2020